Irish Farmers’ Association (IFA) president John O’Sullivan said that farmers had not been consulted over the introduction of a new breed of genetically modified corn which would allow them to sell the crop at higher prices to consumers.

Mr O’Sullivans comments come as a new poll has shown that a majority of farmers support the introduction in the UK of GM maize.

The poll by the IFA found that a whopping 76 per cent of the farmers in the Irish Independent and Irish Times support the importation of GM corn in the United Kingdom.

“We are now in the third year of this project and there is still no indication of whether or not the Government is going to take this seriously or not,” Mr O’ Sullivan told The Irish Independent.

He said that the IFEA would now call on the government to reconsider its decision to introduce GM maize and take the necessary steps to ensure that farmers are fully informed about the risks of the new crop.

“The GM technology is not the solution to the problems of the farming sector, but it will allow us to grow our own crops in a way that will benefit the farmer and their family.

The IFA is calling on the Government to consider taking action to safeguard the interests of farmers, the environment and their livelihoods,” Mr Iorris said.”

Mr O-Sullivan said farmers should also be concerned that the government would continue to import GM maize which has a higher cost-per-gram than conventional maize and that the potential for increased herbicide use in the fields.””

In the event that a decision to import the GM maize is taken, farmers should be aware that the new product will be of greater value to the farmer than the current crop and it is likely to be far more expensive to grow.”

Mr O-Sullivan said farmers should also be concerned that the government would continue to import GM maize which has a higher cost-per-gram than conventional maize and that the potential for increased herbicide use in the fields.

The introduction of GM is likely not to solve any of the problems faced by farmers and there will be many of them that will be hurt and will continue to have to rely on imported varieties.”